Panoramas

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  • What A View

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    This is a panoramic view of one of my favorite places on Earth (That I have visited so far, anyway!), Crater Lake. This place is unreal in its sheer beauty, and it seems like no matter where you stand along the rim of the caldera, there are amazing views unlike anything else on the planet. To give a sense of the raw scale we are talking about here, with how enormous this view really is, look very carefully in the water, and you will see a rather large boat; the sole manmade object floating on the surface of the lake, reduced to a mere dot. From where I stood when taking this photograph to the other shore is about five miles, or eight kilometers. The lake itself is 1,946 feet deep, making it the deepest lake in the United States. This is why the lake is so crisp and BLUE; that is not a photographic trick at work there, that is honest-to-goodness how blue this lake actually is. Beautiful, isn't it?

  • Windy City

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    In April of 2018, I decided to go on a rare journey with my mother, to a convention she deeply wanted to attend, in Chicago. Considering I've been to Chicago several times in my life, but never with a camera as good as what I've got now, I had for the longest time been wanting to tackle some of the Windy City's fabulous sights...but here, on the 94th floor observation deck of the Hancock Tower, I finally got to see the city in all its sparkling glory at night. It's incredible what a sight something like this is. While walking through the city below, one is struck by how fast everything moves; life seems to sprint ahead as you are expected to move from point to point as expeditiously as possible, so as not to block traffic or miss a shop closing...but from above, everything feels slow and tranquil. The city glistens and twinkles with distant motion...and everything feels detached. This photo is the result of around 15 photographs stitched together, taken from two different sides of the Hancock Tower's observation deck. No tripods were allowed (so this was shot by stabilizing my camera directly against the glass!), and the glare on the windows was incredibly difficult to work around...but I think it turned out wonderfully.

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