My Travels

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  • Pareidolia

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    Pareidolia - noun par·ei·do·lia - per-ˌī-ˈdō-lē-ə Definition: The tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern. Example: What do you see here, floating in the sky? It could be any number of things conjured from the remarkable pattern engines locked deep within your mind...but I cannot tell you what your pareidolia wants you to see; only you can. The world is only what we interpret it to be, after all.

  • Placid

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    It was a rainy, depressing day in Harrisburg, PA. My grandfather had just passed away some weeks before, and we were busied rushing to and fro, attending to business involved in his estate...but while crossing the Susquehanna River, peering out across the expanse toward the capital city itself, I could only see fog...and the thin, arched rail of the Market Street Bridge disappearing into the mist. Strangely enough, the whole scene felt utterly peaceful. A quiet moment caught in the middle of a capital city I couldn't even see. I leaned out the window, and took the shot.

  • Presque Autumn

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    I have wanted to do two things for quite a long time now; one of them is to take an excursion during the autumn to take photographs, and another is to make it up to Lake Erie, to visit Presque Isle and take photographs. This year, I was able to do both things...and combine them into one image. Now, I had never been near any lake so enormous as this; it may as well have been an ocean from what I could tell, and oceans are where I am most familiar. The sight of this beautiful tree, in full autumn colors, starkly juxtaposed beside this oceanic scenery was too much for me though. I absolutely had to capture it, and place it here. Here's hoping you enjoy!

  • Progression

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    This is totality. For two brief minutes, after having spent years of planning, and hours huddled beneath a $4 beach umbrella in the blazing South Carolina sun, the skies finally went dark at 2:39 pm, and I was able to behold the utter majesty of a total solar eclipse. It is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the most amazing thing I have ever seen. What you see here is a close-up view of the sun's corona, a 15,000,000 F superheated blanket of magnetized plasma that trails into space in long, curved trails; this is the sun's 'atmosphere', and it can only be seen during a total solar eclipse. Also visible on the righthand side of the sun is a prominence, an enormous loop of superheated plasma arcing from the surface of the sun that could envelop the entirety of our planet Earth; these are also only visible during a total solar eclipse. This may very well have been the most challenging thing I have attempted shooting a photograph of, from the travel and planning required to the expenses paid in acquiring equipment, but it was without a doubt worth it. This is a composite photograph showing the various stages of the total solar eclipse; it represents about two hours of time from the first photograph (on the left) to the last photograph (on the right), and is the product of nearly a thousand photographs taken while sitting in the hot Carolina sun.

  • Red Woods

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    Bushkill Falls, located within the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania, is not just about the falls themselves, but also the large creek that runs through the whole area, Bushkill Creek. This is a scene along the tranquil creek, drained of all color except the deep, earthy red that seemed to radiate from so many of the trees in the area. The result is...actually somewhat haunting, and yet utterly peaceful at the same time.

  • Serpentine Coast

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    One of the mildly frustrating things about flying, at least when flying in a commercial airliner, is the lack of information on what exactly that beautiful landscape is out your window. I see so many wonderful sights...and yet I don't know what it is I'm looking at. It's rare then, that one comes across a geographical feature so striking, that several weeks after the fact I was able to figure out just what it was I was looking at. I charted out our flight path, figuring that there was only a small window of time we spent flying over the Atlantic Ocean...and pinpointed this beautiful river delta to a shore on the Georgia coast. The largest 'river' emptying into the Atlantic? That is Doboy Sound. The closest body of land is Sapelo Island, a wildlife management area...and if you follow along the coast, you will find Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge; contrary to its name, it is a nationally-protected bird habitat. Even without knowing where this is, this is a stunning panoply of natural beauty...and a beautiful example of what water can do to a coastline, given enough time.

  • Shores of Currituck

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    North of the Currituck Lighthouse is a vast stretch of beach, off limits to anything that isn't four wheel drive. It's a more wild, untamed stretch of beach home to the unincorporated community of Currituck, a place unlike any I've actually seen, where the streets themselves are off-road beach territory and the sparse houses are scattered throughout the dunes. It's in this community that a herd of roughly 100 wild Mustangs can be found, their ancestors left behind when visiting Spanish conquistadors returned home. It is actually against the law for any person to be within fifty feet of these beautiful horses, leading to strange situations where wild horses can be found in people's garages, or rolling about in the middle of the sandy streets, or like here where the horses stop and take in the majesty of the Atlantic Ocean. This sight right here genuinely made my day!

  • Sol's Perch

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    This is Bodie Island Lighthouse, a distinctive and beautiful old tower constructed in 1872 along the shores of North Carolina's Outer Banks. It was a sweltering hot day when I'd managed to make my way there, and without a hint of shade in sight, I sought temporary refuge in the shadow of the lighthouse itself...when my friend looked up toward the top of the tower, noticing that the sun itself seemed to form the lighthouse's light. I couldn't be happier I managed to nab the shot!

  • Sunset on the New River Gorge

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    Ah, the New River Gorge Bridge...one of my favorite places on Earth. This beauty is an HDR photograph taken from the observation deck of the New River Gorge Bridge near Fayetteville, West Virginia. For many years, this was the world's longest single-arch steel bridge, spanning 3,030 feet over the New River, 876 feet below the bridge. Truly an amazing sight to behold. This photo was taken at sunset, on our way home from Myrtle Beach, SC. The observation deck this was taken on, actually sits beneath the bridge deck, down a long, long, winding series of stairs through the West Virginian woods. I don't recommend you try and run back up those stairs if you're carrying a bunch of camera equipment; it's a WORKOUT!

  • The Approach

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    This is another view of the long, impressive approach toward Mt. Hood, in northern Oregon. Seeing this mountain was the first time I had truly understood just how enormous mountains really are; nothing we have here in Pennsylvania quite compares. The thing with mountains like this, is that you can see them more or less anywhere you are in the state. In Pennsylvania, there isn't anything at all that can be seen from such a distance. That was why, the first time I saw Mt. Hood, upon landing in Portland, I thought to myself "Gee, that isn't so far away". How wrong I was! Even this view here, the mountain is still roughly half hour to an hour's drive away, along some of the most awe-inspiring terrain I've ever had the privilege to explore.

  • The Climb

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    It felt great to get away from the heat, taking refuge inside the weathered old shell of Bodie Island Lighthouse, and it didn't take long for me to be awestruck by the sights. Problem is, the stairs you see here are very old wrought iron created back during the 1870s, when the lighthouse itself was built. The caretakers of the lighthouse had a very strict 'one person per flight of stairs' policy on those attempting to make the climb to the top, and while I did attempt the climb myself, I was thwarted by the powerful feeling of vertigo the experience induced. These stairs, after all, had no backing to them; look down and one can see straight to the bottom, even as the stairs themselves gently swayed with each footstep. While I'd have loved to see the top, I was nonetheless thoroughly satisfied by my time spent at the bottom, looking up into the dizzying spiral above me.

  • The Day is Done

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    The day came to a close at the fishing docks in Newport, Oregon. The ships were coming to port, the activity came to a crawl as workers turned in their shifts, the sun drooping steadily below the horizon. And yet, through the approach of nightfall, the sea lions continued to bellow. Their cries mingled with the ever present caws of the nearby seagulls, all of them opportunistically plucking at the waters for that next tasty fish. As for the workers of the dock, their day was done. Beautiful scene, isn't it? I thought so, too.

  • The Girl at Smith Rock

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    This is Smith Rock, a natural wonder and climbing hot spot located to the north of the city of Bend, in Oregon. This place does a pretty wondrous job of showcasing just how geographically diverse a place Oregon can be, since this area is truly an arid, bone dry "high desert"; the first of its kind I've ever been to, actually! Smith Rock itself though, is a beauty; albeit a terrifyingly huge one. See that spike of rock off in the distance? It is deceptively HUGE; a person at this scale would appear as a small collection of pixels. Just above the girl's head is a bridge wide enough that you could fit a small car on it. The girl, however, was what caught my eye most about this photo. She went out there, feet dangling off the ledge...and I applaud her for her bravery, considering how steep the drop there was. Still..what a sight. Not a thing I'm about to climb, however!

  • The Oregon Coast

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    This is one of the many gorgeous sights to be had along Oregon's Highway 101, what is possibly one of the most scenic and beautiful drives to be had anywhere in America. This view seemed to stretch out forever, an overlook of the Pacific ocean with mists rolling over the coast in the distance, the skies bright and clear, and people of all ages frolicking in the cold waters below. You can see them down there, some with surfboards, some with nothing but their swim suits, but all of them having a good time.

  • The Slopes of Crater Lake

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    Here is yet another view of the gorgeous Crater Lake, in Oregon, with Wizard Island visible right over there on the right hand side! I cannot stress just how incredible this place is, and how amazingly, breathtakingly blue that water is. Still gets me every time! What struck me about this view, however, was those steep hills in the background; it's like that the whole way around the crater. Ahh, I wish I could go back!

  • The Ultimate Hot Chocolate

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    Six thousand feet above sea level, and another six thousand feet from the summit of the majestic Mt. Hood, at the altitude that trees can no longer grow, there is Timberline Lodge; a stunning, old beauty of a ski resort and lodge. Within this wooden mountain palace, there is a restaurant...and in that restaurant is served the most incredible hot chocolate you will ever drink in your life, bar NONE. This here is that hot chocolate, served piping hot with a stick of cinnamon, garnished with chocolate shavings, whipped cream, and chopped nuts with caramel and spices. This is the definitive hot chocolate! And doesn't it just make you cozy as the colder months of the year approach?

  • Tiny Myrtle

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    This is Myrtle Beach, as seen from a helicopter...but with a twist! On display here is a photographic technique called "tilt-shift photography", which is obtained either via detaching the lens from the camera body and tilting it, or by carefully obtaining the effect in post-processing (which is what I did, as actual tilt-shift gear is phenomenally expensive!). The effect, when done from a high vantage point creates the illusion of looking at a photograph of a model or diorama; a collection of tiny things viewed upon with a magnifying glass. This is something I've always wanted to try my hand at, and what better a way to do so than by taking a helicopter tour? The ride itself was exhilarating and fun, too!

  • Tranquility

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    A cliche thing to call a photograph, isn't it? Tranquility. And yet, that's about the only feeling I get when I look at this photograph, and remember how relieved and relaxed I felt after the great deal of walking I had just done in an effort to find such a beautiful place. We traveled up and down the spit of land that Presque Isle inescapably is, on foot, following a path through the woods that meandered by the sight you find here. I was struck by how still the waters were, how blue the sky is, and how the sunlight behind me cast a brilliant glow on the autumn foliage across the marshes; it all came together in a perfect moment, captured by my camera.

  • Trillium Lake

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    Ah, Trillium Lake. This was possibly one of the most peaceful spots I have ever been to in my life, gentle waters lapping at the stony shore with the majesty of Mt. Hood looming in the background, wild hawks, eagles, and ospreys gliding in the breeze above. Oregon is, if nothing else, a tour de force of all the beautiful things nature can create, somehow jam packed into such a relatively small place. The geographical diversity, truly, is a thing to behold. If you ever get the chance to go to Oregon, please, I beg of you, GO. Sights like this are a dime a dozen there; a photographer's wonderland, really.

  • Up

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    My photograph, "Wooden Warmth" is one of the more popular photographs that I've offered here at Nulion Photography, but it of course wasn't the only photo I'd taken there! While visiting those gorgeous woods along the slopes of Mt. Hood, in Oregon, after taking the shot that would become "Wooden Warmth", I aimed my camera skyward. What I saw was this; the day's final sunlight as it filtered through the treetops, trunks casting stark shadows against the leafy canopy. As I recall, that was my last photograph for the day; not five minutes later, the sun had dipped far enough beneath the horizon that the warm, golden color seen here had faded into memory.

  • Upward

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    One of my favorite features of the Carolinas, South Carolina in particular, are these trees. I'm not actually sure what kind they are, but my best guess is a "shortleaf pine", and these things are found all over the place. There's something very photographically fascinating about these trees to me, since whenever I come upon a forest full of these down there, I see a strangely symmetrical forest of vertical "rods", with almost no branches or even underbrush. I've struggled to think of some sort of interesting way to portray these trees for years now, to say nothing of how to actually get up close to one of these 'stick forests' without getting bitten by a snake or chased by an alligator or something wild like that. (They aren't exactly pedestrian-friendly, after all!) So, while wandering around a plantation down there, I noticed a thicket of these trees by the road, and attempted a 'bug's eye view'.

  • Vacant Web

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    Just in time for Halloween, we have this! All alone, strung up between a set of branches along the Zig Zag trail, along the slopes of Mt. Hood, was this spider's web. Taken literally steps away from my other photo, "Wooden Warmth", this spider web, while vacant, was still beautifully constructed. I may be squeamish of spiders, but I cannot help but respect them for what they do, and how meticulously they do it. How long did it take for the spider to create this web? Furthermore, I wonder what the spider was off doing while I was taking photos of its silken home. Probably off doing spider-stuff. Ah well! Hats off to you, Mr. Spider; you built yourself a fine web!

  • Verdant Countryside

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    This is an HDR photograph taken in Amish Country, outside of New Philadelphia, OH. Taken in late October, 2011. We had been driving along in a friend's pickup truck through the beautiful fields, along these fine gravel roads, bumpy and rocky...and there, right out the front window, was this scene. I told the driver to stop, since we were the only car on the road, and through the windshield, without even stepping outside, I took this amazing photo. To date, this is one of my favorite shots that I've ever taken!

  • West Virginia Sunrise

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    This was a photograph taken while riding down through the heart of West Virginia, gazing out upon a beautiful sunrise. What a gorgeous state! We were driving toward Myrtle Beach, passing through all these wonderful mountains, and I just so happened to have my camera on me. I took this shot right out the side window, while in the back of the car, and until recently, I hadn't even noticed how good-looking a picture it was!

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