My Travels

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  • Where It's Made

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    Deep within the heart of Pennsylvania, one can find the Pennsylvania Dutch region. It is here, nestled within this hilly, mostly rural area that you will find the town of Pottsville. Nestled within this small town is America's oldest brewery; that of Yuengling & Son's, founded in 1829. I had the recent opportunity to tour this beautiful, industrial revolution-era building from the inside out, and despite the high volume of tourists buzzing about on their tours and the genuinely oppressive heat permeating the building, I managed to get this shot of Yuengling's brewing facilities. This is the place where the beer itself is made, right around the enormous tanks used to bring the hops, barley, and other ingredients together into the Yuengling brew enjoyed by so many up and down the eastern coast, from New York to Florida!

  • Wind Turbines in Autumn

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    Road trip time! This time we were headed out across the gorgeous autumnal Pennsylvanian countryside on our way to Pottsville, and some delicious Pennsylvania Dutch cooking. On our way, my fears as a photographer had started to manifest themselves in the form of gloomy, overcast weather and torrential downpours. Cold, wet, and looking ahead to a day where I likely wouldn't be able to catch anything on my camera, I nearly gave up hope. Then, the clouds quite literally parted and out burst forth this gorgeous rainbow, spreading itself over the hills in the distance, as enormous modern wind turbines twirled about eternally in the distance. The sunlight spread across the valley, bringing light and color to the multicolored trees...and after leaning out the front window of a moving car, I managed to catch this shot.

  • Wizard Island

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    In southern Oregon, there was an enormous mountain of a volcano, Mount Mazama. However, thousands of years ago, this 12,000 foot tall stratovolcano collapsed in on itself in what must have been a chaotic maelstrom of nature's fury. What we are left with, however...is this. The deepest lake in the United States, at nearly 2,000 feet, with a lone island situated in the middle of what is truly the BLUEST water I have ever seen in my life. I have not doctored this photo, I have not edited it, I haven't even boosted the color vibrance of the photograph; it is ACTUALLY this blue. The reason for it is the sheer depth and purity of the water; these two factors ensure that all colors of light but blue are absorbed by the lake. The result is an incredible, surreal vista of cerulean and volcanic rock, thick with trees and growth all around the caldera. And right out there, that lone island I mentioned? That is "Wizard Island", which itself is a cinder cone volcano, sat WITHIN another volcano. Isn't nature a wonderful thing?

  • Wooden Warmth

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    Walking through the woods near Mt. Hood, in Oregon, we made our way to the Zig Zag falls along a nice little nature trail. The whole forest was beautiful, so different from the forests you'd find in Pennsylvania, and everything had a warmer, softer, mossier feel to it. Then, on the way out of the woods, I noticed the sunlight filtering through the trees and how it gave the woods such a warm look...and I knew I had to capture it on my camera. This here is the result, after combining the images together into a single, beautiful HDR!

  • Yaquina Spiral

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    On the Pacific coast, in Oregon, there is a beautiful old lighthouse, said to be haunted...sat atop a forlorn spit of land jutting into the turbulent waters below, as sand flies buzz outside and the bellowing barks of sea lions echo in the breeze. Walking inside, I could smell the musty history of this old thing; it had first been lighted in 1873, after all. Upon entering, my first instinct was to look directly up; 93 feet from the floor to the light itself, I peered upward through the iron spiral...and this is what I saw.

  • Yuengling's Cavern

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    In the small town of Pottsville, Pennsylvania, visitors can find the oldest beer brewery in America; Yuengling & Son's, which had produced its first beer in 1829, and has since become iconic to beer enthusiasts up and down the eastern seaboard. The wonderful thing about this brewery, even though I don't actually drink beer myself, is that they give free tours year-round to those who make the pilgrimage. As a part of the tour, we were shuffled down flights of industrial revolution-era stairs, and into a huge, expansive cavern that stayed at a cool 50 degrees, year-round. With the temperature rising well above 85 outside, being in this dark, cool place was an absolute godsend. Fortunately for the founders of the Yuengling brewery, this natural cavern formation was also the perfect place, at the perfect temperature, to store beer. This hallway you see in this photo connects the Yuengling factory proper with the dark, stony walls of the cavern, where workers a hundred years ago rolled enormous barrels (Some of the smaller ones, you can clearly see!) of freshly-brewed ale from the pressure-injection room, down to be stored in the caverns below. Makes you thirsty, doesn't it?

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