My Travels

  • Views:
Pages:
  • Daybroken

    from $45.00

    Every single morning during my trip this year to the Outer Banks, I was up at the crack of dawn in anticipation of the sunrise. I'd set my camera out on the deck every night so the humidity wouldn't cause my lenses to fog up, I'd set my alarm, and before anybody else would be awake I'd be out there and on the beach, watching the sun creep up above the horizon. This particular morning, I decided to go further, and traveled to the time-worn Avalon Pier, further south along the shore than where I'd been staying...and it absolutely paid off!

  • Depoe Morning

    from $20.00

    Along the Oregonian coastline is a small, beautiful coastal town built on a foundation of rugged, volcanic basalt. A lone arch bridge stretches over the mouth of the bay, where every morning fishing trawlers reach through the early morning mist and out into the cold, whale-populated waters of the Pacific. This is Depoe Bay. I had such a time here, my camera and I were going crazy trying to capture the soul of this beautiful little place on film. Even though the whole of the place begged to be photographed, it was this bridge in particular that enchanted me the most. There was something about it, and how the mist off the ocean wrapped around its pillars...I loved it. If you're ever in the area, check out the Sea Hag restaurant, just before this bridge! They make a mean sandwich. Oh yes, and definitely partake in one of the whale sighting tours, too; we saw several grey whales and even humpbacks!

  • Driftwood

    from $20.00

    On a recent trip up to northern Pennsylvania, one that I had intended to take for many years now, I finally managed to make it to the rough-sanded shores of Lake Erie. The whole trip there had been gloomy, gray, and as difficult on the eyes as one could reasonably expect a Pennsylvania autumn day to be...and yet, by the time we reached the beaches of Presque Isle, the sky finally cleared up, revealing a brilliant blue that seemed to stretch into eternity. I walked along the coastline, in awe at how ocean-like this lake really looked in person. It looked, smelled, and felt like the warm sandy beaches of South Carolina I was so familiar with, but alien at the same time. Even the sand, devoid of seashells, was dense enough to not get everywhere just by walking upon it. And then, by happenstance, I came across this lovely piece of weathered old driftwood. I had to capture it! ...And now, you see the result.

  • Grandeur

    from $20.00

    The beaches of Oregon are truly something to behold. Around every corner you'll find sights like this, sandy beaches encroached upon by rocky shoreline, and enormous chunks of rock jutting skyward from the foamy Pacific. There are so many places to simply stand and observe, and yet I don't think any amount of time would have been enough for me to fully take it in. The sheer enormity of the view beyond was almost too much. For a sense of scale, look down toward the bottom center of the photograph, and you will see a small speck. That is a person.

  • Helix

    from $45.00

    As a photographer, I consider it part of my job description to always be on the hunt for interesting shapes and patterns, and there are few places to find more interesting ones than on the inside of a lighthouse. Looking up from the bottom of one of these colossal structures is in itself daunting; one feels as though they could fall backwards just trying to take it all in! This is the view one would get upon looking straight up, while standing at the base of the Currituck Lighthouse in Corolla, NC. This beautiful old brick light was built way back in 1873 and rises 162 feet into the air, visible for miles around when its light turns on after dusk.

  • Hole in the Sky

    from $20.00

    This is totality. For two brief minutes, after having spent years of planning, and hours huddled beneath a $4 beach umbrella in the blazing South Carolina sun, the skies finally went dark at 2:39 pm, and I was able to behold the utter majesty of a total solar eclipse. It is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the most amazing thing I have ever seen. What you see here is a close-up view of the sun's corona, a 15,000,000 F superheated blanket of magnetized plasma that trails into space in long, curved trails; this is the sun's 'atmosphere', and it can only be seen during a total solar eclipse. Also visible on the righthand side of the sun is a prominence, an enormous loop of superheated plasma arcing from the surface of the sun that could envelop the entirety of our planet Earth; these are also only visible during a total solar eclipse. This may very well have been the most challenging thing I have attempted shooting a photograph of, from the travel and planning required to the expenses paid in acquiring equipment, but it was without a doubt worth it.

  • Hydrangean Bloom

    from $20.00

    Touring the Oregon coast was truly an all out assault of beauty on every one of my senses, most of all the things that I could see there. Right along the side of Highway 101 was this small rest stop, where parts of the film The Goonies were shot. (Marking the location, funnily enough, was a spraypainted 'truffle shuffle' marking on a door) Right by the road, away from the ocean itself, was this collection of incredibly blue hydrangeas that I just had to snap a few shots of.

  • Impressionistic

    from $20.00

    This is not a painting. What this IS, however, is a surreal look down into the waters of Bushkill Creek, deep within the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania. The water flourished with colors, the trees and sky and leaves all reflecting in the crystal clear waters to come up with this surreal effect that literally resembles an oil painting more than it resembles a photograph. I just couldn't resist taking a shot of this water, seeing the way it exploded with color..and the results turned out more beautiful than I imagined!

  • Journey's End

    from $20.00

    So, I had finally made it. All the way to Oregon, from the distant forests of Pennsylvania. It is extremely fitting then, that this view right here was my very first glimpse of the Pacific Ocean, in all its raw beauty. The location: the quaint resort town of Seaside, Oregon. It was just the coolest feeling, knowing that the largest ocean in the world was spread out before me, and that my first view of the Pacific had everything to do with the statue you see in this photograph. The statue stood in the middle of this small roundabout depicted the famed explorers, Lewis and Clark, as the pair had for the first time reached the Pacific Ocean, themselves. The view was nothing short of majestic, the shorelines plentiful with a contour and texture that I'd never seen before; there were actual mountains, it seemed, jutting into the ocean. Up until this time, the only beaches I had ever seen were the smooth, relatively featureless ones in the Carolinas, Maryland, and Florida. Shortly after I took this photograph, I discovered a truth about the northern Pacific that should have been obvious; the water is FREEZING! I spent the better part of the day reeling from the strange dichotomy of being at a beach, in the hottest months of the summer, and knowing that some of the coldest water I've ever been was right there, across the beach. Even more bewildering was the fact that people were playing in it like it was nothing.

  • Life and Death

    from $20.00

    Pennsylvania's mountainous regions hide many beautiful little secrets, such as this one I saw before me, as we explored the wooded countryside. Near the town of Ashland, PA, there is a miniscule but wonderful little place called Fountain Springs. Hugging the small town is a graveyard nearly as large as the town itself; hundreds of graves dating from long ago dotted the landscape, with one of Pennsylvania's many rolling mountainous hills looming in the background. The striking thing I noted as I passed by, however, were the large patches of daylillies growing all around the cemetery. They were beautiful, and begged a photograph or two. Thankfully, I was able to come away from there with this wonderful, selective color photo. An interesting fact, by the way? This photo was taken very close to the historic coal mining town of Centralia; where a coal fire has been burning out of control beneath the city since 1961, forcing its residents to evacuate, leaving the area itself a ghost town of trees and deteriorated roads, pockmarked by gas and fume vents. While I did get to travel to Centralia itself, it's amazing how little there really was to take photographs of there; the town is little more now than barren roads criss-crossing through overgrown fields and brush.

  • Light in the Woods

    from $20.00

    Here, you see the Currituck Lighthouse situated in Corolla, NC. This lighthouse, built in 1873, is currently situated in the middle of a thicket of trees that gives it a very different feeling from any other lighthouse I've yet encountered. Most of the time, when I imagine "lighthouse", I imagine a forlorn place situated at the tip of a triangular cape, jutting out into the ocean or a large building sat right along the water's edge...but never within a genuine forest! The red stone of this lighthouse distinguishes it from its peers as well; most lighthouses are black and white, featuring large patterns distinguishable at a distance, but not so with Currituck. That alone does distinguish it, does it not?

  • Metrosphere

    from $20.00

    This photo was taken beside Cloud Gate, at Millennium Park in Chicago, IL. I love the way the mirrored curve of Cloud Gate reflected off of the city around it, curving it and distorting it. I then took that idea that the mirror curved the world around it, and wondered what it'd be like if all the color existed only inside of that mirror, leaving the rest of the world colorless. This photograph was featured (In full black and white) in the 2010 issue of Penn State Greater Allegheny's "Absence" art magazine.

  • Morning Surf

    from $20.00

    There's nothing quite so pure and liberating as the ocean. Truly, I can't think of a place that more peels away the veneer of artificiality that our lives are steeped in, to lay bare the pure joy of being alive in the moment. The raw beauty of an Atlantic Ocean sunrise, similarly, is enough to soothe the soul and make one feel as though, somehow, everything will be alright. Then, there are those who actively dive into it and let it move them...which is much more than I can imagine doing, especially in seas as notoriously rough as those off the shores of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Here, we see a lone surfer waiting to catch a wave as the sun rises in one of the most dramatic mornings I've ever been witness to. Look at it...relax...inhale, smell the salt and sand, hear the waves crashing and the gulls cawing...

  • Morningstar

    from $25.00

    It was the morning after the eclipse of 2017, and I had scant few hours to use the enormous lens I'd rented online, just to be able to photograph the eclipse itself. It is usually tradition for me to wake up as early as I can to attempt capturing the bewildering sunrises that can be seen from the Atlantic coast, but only on the last day before we depart Myrtle Beach...and on this day, i got up early not only to give that big, beautiful lens one last spin, but also to see what kind of unusual weather patterns might have been spurred on by the eclipse the day before. I watched as this massive head of clouds obscured my chance at seeing the actual disc of the sun rise over the watery horizon, but what I was treated to instead of the sun's orange disc, was this majestic burst of starlight as the morning's light fought its way through a mass of thunderclouds. Of course, I eagerly snapped as many photos as I could with the big lens...but I ran into a problem; if you bring metal and glass lenses out from a cool, air-conditioned hotel room and into the hot, humid air of a Carolina beach, you are going to wind up with a lens coated in fog, inside and out. That's what happened to the big lens, anyway! Thankfully, I had another lens with me; my trusty old 18-200mm, which sat attached to a second camera I'd brought along. Months after the fact, after I'd thought the photos taken during that majestic sunrise were blurred beyond salvation due to condensation and fog, I remembered that I had these sitting on the other memory card...and lo, it had turned out just fine in the end.

  • Mountain's Majesty

    from $20.00

    They might not be purple...but they are majestic, aren't they? I am not quite sure what mountains these are, since there are so many mountains in Oregon, but my money is on Mt. Jefferson for the big mountain in the foreground. As for the ones in the background? ...I'm not sure. This sight, however, was the first part of Oregon that greeted me on the flight in, and it was just the most amazing sight; I have seen plenty of neat things from out the window of an airplane, but this was simply *breathtaking*. It was a prelude of what was to come, really!

  • Myrtle Beach Sunrise

    from $20.00

    One of my favorite places in the world is Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. It's truly one of the most chilled-out, relaxed places to be, and my family has a long history of visiting the place for the perfect way to close out the summer. As is tradition, on the final day of our stay, I will get up early in the morning to watch the sun rise over the Atlantic, and every time I am humbled by the experience; it makes the groggy, difficult morning worth it, every time! This right here is exactly why.

  • Neahkahnie

    from $45.00

    When I reminisce about some of the amazing things I've seen in my lifetime, my mind often drifts back to this place...to US Route 101, the highway that winds its way along the Oregon coast, stretching from Washington to Baja California...and it is truly one of the greatest road trips I've ever had in my life. This photo right here encapsulates that journey; an absolute spectacle of steep cliffs and ocean majesty found by simply rounding an innocent-looking corner. This is the Neahkahnie lookout point, hanging along the edge of the identically-named mountain, and overlooking the small town of Neahkahnie Beach. Now, I'm normally a man with a strong fear of heights...and the sheer cliffs I was standing mere feet from should have instilled me with terror, yet it just didn't Who could be terrified, with a sight this incredible laid out before them? If you want to get a sense of the scale on offer here, look to the left of the image; there is a small red car there on the road....and not a guardrail in sight.

  • Newport Sunset

    from $20.00

    The bridge defines Newport; it is perhaps the city's biggest landmark. Here is sits, basked in the glow of a late evening's sunset. Across the bridge, employees of the Rogue Beer factory at the far end of the bridge hang their hard hats and clock out, heading home for the evening. The city winds down, the busy fishing port readying itself for the evening. The clouds roll away from the city, pushed by the winds brought in from the Pacific, and all I could do was gaze upon it in wonder. Yet another reason Oregon is one of the most beautiful places on Earth, and yet another photograph I'm proud to have been there to take.

  • Nuclear Phonebooth

    from $20.00

    It seems to be a kind of recurring theme here, that I'm finding London phone booths in places they *shouldn't* be. Well, it's also odd to be finding one that is a very different color from what it should be too! This one isn't in the middle of Oregon, but instead it is near a restaurant in Myrtle Beach, along the South Carolinian coast...and covered in graffiti. The graffiti is actually somehow tasteful though, messages scrawled all over it by tourists and regulars, the messages extending from the phone booth and onto every surface of the restaurant itself. Somehow, it all blends into this relaxed, beach atmosphere spiked with a touch of the odd, and it all just *works*. On top of that, it was all awfully photogenic, too! Ahh, Myrtle Beach. Love it!

  • Oregonian Dream

    from $20.00

    There are truly wonderful things that one can find during a drive down Oregon's Highway 101. Take this photograph for instance; a dream willed into solid reality, thanks to the wildly varied, utterly remarkable diversity found all over the state. This scene could be found literally off to the side of Highway 101, where a scenic overlook treats passers-by to this view; a steep cliff leading down toward the seasonably cold waters of the north Pacific, gulls flying off into the distance, waves crashing hundreds of feet below.

  • Orthogonal Void

    from $45.00

    It's difficult to explain the feeling I get from this photograph. When I look at it, I see tendrils emanating from the void...but that of course isn't at all what it is. Is this a photograph taken from within that inscrutable, infinitesimally thin line that separates our reality from another? Could it be the call to approach the unknown? Or, could it be that the photographer was simply messing around and decided to join two photographs of a pier together, horizontally? I'll let you decide!

  • Pareidolia

    from $20.00

    Pareidolia - noun par·ei·do·lia - per-ˌī-ˈdō-lē-ə Definition: The tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern. Example: What do you see here, floating in the sky? It could be any number of things conjured from the remarkable pattern engines locked deep within your mind...but I cannot tell you what your pareidolia wants you to see; only you can. The world is only what we interpret it to be, after all.

  • Presque Autumn

    from $20.00

    I have wanted to do two things for quite a long time now; one of them is to take an excursion during the autumn to take photographs, and another is to make it up to Lake Erie, to visit Presque Isle and take photographs. This year, I was able to do both things...and combine them into one image. Now, I had never been near any lake so enormous as this; it may as well have been an ocean from what I could tell, and oceans are where I am most familiar. The sight of this beautiful tree, in full autumn colors, starkly juxtaposed beside this oceanic scenery was too much for me though. I absolutely had to capture it, and place it here. Here's hoping you enjoy!

  • Progression

    from $35.00

    This is totality. For two brief minutes, after having spent years of planning, and hours huddled beneath a $4 beach umbrella in the blazing South Carolina sun, the skies finally went dark at 2:39 pm, and I was able to behold the utter majesty of a total solar eclipse. It is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the most amazing thing I have ever seen. What you see here is a close-up view of the sun's corona, a 15,000,000 F superheated blanket of magnetized plasma that trails into space in long, curved trails; this is the sun's 'atmosphere', and it can only be seen during a total solar eclipse. Also visible on the righthand side of the sun is a prominence, an enormous loop of superheated plasma arcing from the surface of the sun that could envelop the entirety of our planet Earth; these are also only visible during a total solar eclipse. This may very well have been the most challenging thing I have attempted shooting a photograph of, from the travel and planning required to the expenses paid in acquiring equipment, but it was without a doubt worth it. This is a composite photograph showing the various stages of the total solar eclipse; it represents about two hours of time from the first photograph (on the left) to the last photograph (on the right), and is the product of nearly a thousand photographs taken while sitting in the hot Carolina sun.

Pages: