My Travels

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  • A Colorful Bend

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    This photograph has been sitting on my hard drive for nearly a year now! Taken in late October of 2011, this was a scene from out of a dream, the road bending around a corner in the midst of autumn, deep in the heart of Ohio's Amish Country. I had just noticed this photo and how beautiful it really turned out to be, especially after draining out just a few of the colors, the ones that would otherwise take away from what autumn is REALLY about; the reds, the oranges, and the yellows. 'Tis the season for beautiful colors!

  • A Day at Yaquina Head

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    Near Newport, Oregon, is a place called Yaquina Head, once upon a time known as Cape Foulweather. Jutting out into the ocean is a point of land weathered by the waves, carved into a point, where in 1871, a lighthouse was constructed. To this day, it is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, and was even featured in the 2002 film "The Ring". To date, I don't believe I have ever visited a more forlorn place...nor have I visited a place with so many flies. The odd, unexpected thing about this place is the sheer mind-boggling amount of kelp flies buzzing about, the benign bugs zipping about in such numbers that I honestly had difficulty keeping my footing for this HDR shot, since the flies would land on my legs and tickle them. Still, the trip to Yaquina Head was completely worth it!

  • A Touch of the UK

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    At the foot of Mt. Hood in Oregon, at a mountain resort we had spent the night at toward the end of my journey to Oregon, I came across the strangest thing. Near a golf course, a long, long way from home, was a red phone booth straight out of London. Completely authentic, worn and weathered, and still plastered with information on the inside that proved its genuine British heritage, I couldn't help but be mesmerized by how out of place and gorgeous this old phone booth was. So I stepped inside, held my camera toward the windows, and took some photos. Everyone knows the deep, characteristic RED of a London phone booth, and I just had to make that the highlight of this piece. So here you are; a London phone booth, somehow transplanted to an Oregonian mountain resort, at the foot of a volcano.

  • A World in a Box

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    I will not lie, I had spent way too long trying to find some kind of profound quote to attach to this photograph, but that seems a little pretentious, doesn't it? The truth of the matter is, I love trying new things, artistically. I want to better myself, push myself outward and learn new techniques I can use to blend the abstract with reality. Thanks to the magic of YouTube, I was able to find a tutorial on how to create 'angular images' similar to the visual aesthetic of a certain big budget movie about a trek through the world of dreams. I used that tutorial as a launch pad to put together this piece, a surrealist bending of the natural into something quite unnatural and dreamlike. I'd definitely like to try more of this in the future!

  • Amish Road

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    This HDR photo is another of those beautiful, empty roads out in Ohio's Amish Country, outside of New Philadelphia OH. This was taken in late October, 2011. It's so beautiful out there, more so than I had ever imagined. I was taken out to Amish Country by my friend and his mother, and hadn't a clue that such sights could be found out there. I asked my friend's mom to stop the car, as we were alone on the road at that point, and I nabbed this shot, just like I had gotten the other Amish-themed photographs in my store. I want to go back so badly, maybe this time in the summer, when the grass and trees are that much greener and more vibrant. I promise, I'll take pictures! :)

  • Amish Sunset

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    This HDR photo is another of those beautiful, empty roads out in Ohio's Amish Country, outside of New Philadelphia OH. This was taken in late October, 2011. After a long day spent exploring the countryside, taking in the beauty, the sun had started to set, and the rain clouds had begun to move in. I was sad to have to leave this place, but at least through the windshield of my friend's car, I got this shot, as the sun went down. Take a visit to Amish Country sometime, people; it's truly one of the most peaceful places you can go!

  • Appalachia

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    Pennsylvania has some of the most gorgeous countryside in America. From its many farms to its plentiful covered bridges and winding roads, a trip through Pennsylvania's countryside is utterly refreshing. We saw plenty of beautiful things during our trip out to Pottsville, but it was this particular road, out in the middle of Pennsylvanian nowhere (or Pennsyltucky as we call it here), that simply captivated me. Perhaps it's the road leading into the unknown, or the dimming sunlight that set the environment into a blaze of colors...I'm not sure, but I knew I had to take a photograph and share it with the world.

  • Appalachian Sundown

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    The drive between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh is long; about three hours spent on the Turnpike, weaving through tunnels and driving alongside the rolling mountains of Appalachia. During this particular trip, I decided to pull up a map of Pennsylvanian covered bridges, and attempt to navigate toward one of them. The sun was setting fast, daylight was wasting away quickly beneath the horizon, and I had to get on site as fast as possible. We drove, through farmlands and small rural hamlets that could be missed in the blink of an eye, and eventually found the covered bridge...but it was all for naught; the bridge was in a terrible state of disrepair, barely safe for driving over, let alone being the subject of one of my photographs. On the way back, I thought myself empty-handed...until I looked out of the window, and saw this sight; a picturesque farmland, populated by cattle, under a rosy sunset sky, set against the backdrop of autumn Appalachian mountains.

  • Astoria

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    On our trek around the beautiful state of Oregon, one of the very first stops we had made was to this small, gorgeous town; Astoria. I'd never seen such enormous ships before, just floating out on the Columbia River, with the mountainous Washington State in the background on the other side of the water. This town was at the razor's edge of Oregon, at the very northwestern tip of the state, and serves as a great, beautiful introduction to the rest of the state. All at once a quaint, sleepy fishing town and fading vacation destination, I found a lot to love about Astoria, even though my time there was short. I would most certainly love to return someday, if only to take more pictures!

  • Basalt Shores of Depoe Bay

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    This is an image from the stark, grey beauty of Oregon's own Depoe Bay, a town on the Pacific shore with a beach made of dark, ancient volcanic basalt deposits. This is looking north, along the coastal highway 101, right in the early morning as the mist creeps in from the ice-cold ocean. It was *amazingly* beautiful...and haunting. The breeze was strong that misty morning, and one could travel away from the town's single main street (Highway 101) toward the frigid waters of the Pacific, and find these strange plants growing all along the craggy, darkened rocks that constituted Depoe Bay's shoreline. It was a landscape unlike any I'd seen before, and one I simply had to capture on camera.

  • Basalt Shores of Depoe Bay 2

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    This is another image from the sleepy, beautiful town of Depoe Bay, Oregon. In this image I pulled the lens back so that you can see more of the surrounding area; the large wall that held up the town's main road (Highway 101), and how the shores of this small fishing town quickly fell into a beautiful, craggy shoreline made entirely of volcanic basalt. The whole town felt dreamy and placid, despite the roaring of the Pacific Ocean's waters down below, and the constant squawk-chirping of young seagulls, many of which lived beneath the city's large single-arch stone bridge.

  • Beneath Autumn Skies

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    On the outskirts of Amish Country during my trip to New Philadelphia in 2011, the sun was finally beginning to go down. It was time to head home. On our way out of the area, we came across this graveyard, just on the very edge where one could begin to see power lines again, but where the view was no less stunning. It was cold and bitter outside, the weather giving the sunset a bit of a steely and arctic feel, but none of that diminished the beauty of the landscape. Graveyards can be amazing places to take photos, even if they have that air of eternal silence about them!

  • Black Hole Sun

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    Totality is such a fleeting experience; so much happens in such a short amount of time that it can be absolutely dizzying; as a photographer, that translates to a laundry list of things to be certain of in a very short span of time. Did I take the solar filter off of the lens? Is my lens stabilized? Do I have the ISO and the settings correct? Most importantly...will the weather hold up? The weather was my very biggest concern when shooting the eclipse...and in a stroke of absolutely cosmic luck, we got to see the eclipse surrounded by a halo of clouds. Had we been even a mile or two in any other direction, we wouldn't have seen it...and yet, there it was. Just as the eclipse started to end, the moon moving away from the solar disc, the clouds began to roll in...and as the clouds started to obscure the sun, the brilliant and aptly named "diamond ring" effect (where the sun's light forms a brilliant 'gem' at the apex of the lunar disc) took shape. It took me weeks after the fact to realize I'd even captured the effect, as I pored through all the hundreds and hundreds of eclipse photographs I took, all in the pursuit of that one perfect, shining image. I couldn't be happier that I managed to capture it.

  • Caldera's Edge

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    This here is Crater Lake itself, or rather the edge of the caldera that forms the "bowl" the lake sits inside of. To the left side of this photo, you can see Wizard Island, which is the star of another of my Oregon photographs. Crater Lake itself was formed out of the remains of an ancient volcano, Mt. Mazama. Imagine an entire mountain, simply collapsing inward onto itself; over time the resulting pit flooded with water, creating the deepest lake in the United States. Wizard Island is itself a growing volcano, rising from out of the ashes of Mt. Mazama; it will eventually become massive in its own right, sometime in the distant future. For now though, I can safely say this must truly be one of the more beautiful places on this Earth, and you can see why! The lake is so pristine, so pure and cerulean in color (because of its depth and purity), and the caldera itself feels so incredibly vast...It makes a guy feel downright tiny. But still, I was happy that I went there, I was very happy I was able to see such an amazing sight. I'll restate the obvious here; Oregon is one amazing, beautiful state!

  • Coalescence

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    So, it was a beautiful day in central Ohio, and I was out visiting family. We were having fun, everyone running around the park or sat around the benches so that they might escape the bright, sweltering sun...and yet there I was, hunkered down on my stomach, camera pointed at this one tree for what felt like a solid half hour. Every shot, it felt, was a mistake. Was this one good? No, the aperture was too wide and the sky was washed out. Was this one good? Nope, too dark. How about this one? Gah, it's blurry! Photography is a test of patience, I swear. There was something about this singular tree though, as unassuming as it was on the surface...it just attracted me to it. I kept trying, kept shooting...and by the time I got home, I very quickly figured out what I wanted to do. What you see is the result!

  • Crimson Beach

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    I've been a lot of places by now, and I've seen a lot of things while in pursuit of a great photograph. I'm always learning, always honing and sharpening my skills. Some scenes you really have to work with, get the angle on, and eke out the beauty using uncommon perspective to find the real potential of a place...but other scenes, like this one taken on the shores of Presque Isle, are just obvious. You come upon it, inhale the fresh air, and just *know* that you've found something special. Well, I found it. Presque Isle is absolutely loaded with these kinds of scenes; beauty around every literal corner, and I can't wait to go back.

  • Crisp and Crimson

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    In the autumn of 2015, my step-grandfather passed away in his sleep, after a long and difficult battle with cancer and diabetes. He had lived a long and fruitful life, and is the source of a tremendous number of memories throughout my life; he'll certainly be missed! As a final parting gift, he had brought the family together for a military funeral deep in the hills of Pennsylvania, at the Indiantown Gap National Cemetery, where he was to be given a soldier's funeral. The grounds of the cemetery were stoic and calm as cemeteries tend to be, but sprinkled throughout the grounds were these incredible trees, caught in the very zenith of their autumn beauty. I don't believe I had ever seen anything so vibrantly RED in all of my life, and fortunately (expecting this kind of beauty during the autumn months) I had my camera with me. I angled to the bright blue October sky, beneath that gorgeous red tree, and captured the image you see here.

  • Depoe Morning

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    Along the Oregonian coastline is a small, beautiful coastal town built on a foundation of rugged, volcanic basalt. A lone arch bridge stretches over the mouth of the bay, where every morning fishing trawlers reach through the early morning mist and out into the cold, whale-populated waters of the Pacific. This is Depoe Bay. I had such a time here, my camera and I were going crazy trying to capture the soul of this beautiful little place on film. Even though the whole of the place begged to be photographed, it was this bridge in particular that enchanted me the most. There was something about it, and how the mist off the ocean wrapped around its pillars...I loved it. If you're ever in the area, check out the Sea Hag restaurant, just before this bridge! They make a mean sandwich. Oh yes, and definitely partake in one of the whale sighting tours, too; we saw several grey whales and even humpbacks!

  • Driftwood

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    On a recent trip up to northern Pennsylvania, one that I had intended to take for many years now, I finally managed to make it to the rough-sanded shores of Lake Erie. The whole trip there had been gloomy, gray, and as difficult on the eyes as one could reasonably expect a Pennsylvania autumn day to be...and yet, by the time we reached the beaches of Presque Isle, the sky finally cleared up, revealing a brilliant blue that seemed to stretch into eternity. I walked along the coastline, in awe at how ocean-like this lake really looked in person. It looked, smelled, and felt like the warm sandy beaches of South Carolina I was so familiar with, but alien at the same time. Even the sand, devoid of seashells, was dense enough to not get everywhere just by walking upon it. And then, by happenstance, I came across this lovely piece of weathered old driftwood. I had to capture it! ...And now, you see the result.

  • Grandeur

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    The beaches of Oregon are truly something to behold. Around every corner you'll find sights like this, sandy beaches encroached upon by rocky shoreline, and enormous chunks of rock jutting skyward from the foamy Pacific. There are so many places to simply stand and observe, and yet I don't think any amount of time would have been enough for me to fully take it in. The sheer enormity of the view beyond was almost too much. For a sense of scale, look down toward the bottom center of the photograph, and you will see a small speck. That is a person.

  • Hole in the Sky

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    This is totality. For two brief minutes, after having spent years of planning, and hours huddled beneath a $4 beach umbrella in the blazing South Carolina sun, the skies finally went dark at 2:39 pm, and I was able to behold the utter majesty of a total solar eclipse. It is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the most amazing thing I have ever seen. What you see here is a close-up view of the sun's corona, a 15,000,000 F superheated blanket of magnetized plasma that trails into space in long, curved trails; this is the sun's 'atmosphere', and it can only be seen during a total solar eclipse. Also visible on the righthand side of the sun is a prominence, an enormous loop of superheated plasma arcing from the surface of the sun that could envelop the entirety of our planet Earth; these are also only visible during a total solar eclipse. This may very well have been the most challenging thing I have attempted shooting a photograph of, from the travel and planning required to the expenses paid in acquiring equipment, but it was without a doubt worth it.

  • Hydrangean Bloom

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    Touring the Oregon coast was truly an all out assault of beauty on every one of my senses, most of all the things that I could see there. Right along the side of Highway 101 was this small rest stop, where parts of the film The Goonies were shot. (Marking the location, funnily enough, was a spraypainted 'truffle shuffle' marking on a door) Right by the road, away from the ocean itself, was this collection of incredibly blue hydrangeas that I just had to snap a few shots of.

  • Impressionistic

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    This is not a painting. What this IS, however, is a surreal look down into the waters of Bushkill Creek, deep within the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania. The water flourished with colors, the trees and sky and leaves all reflecting in the crystal clear waters to come up with this surreal effect that literally resembles an oil painting more than it resembles a photograph. I just couldn't resist taking a shot of this water, seeing the way it exploded with color..and the results turned out more beautiful than I imagined!

  • Journey's End

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    So, I had finally made it. All the way to Oregon, from the distant forests of Pennsylvania. It is extremely fitting then, that this view right here was my very first glimpse of the Pacific Ocean, in all its raw beauty. The location: the quaint resort town of Seaside, Oregon. It was just the coolest feeling, knowing that the largest ocean in the world was spread out before me, and that my first view of the Pacific had everything to do with the statue you see in this photograph. The statue stood in the middle of this small roundabout depicted the famed explorers, Lewis and Clark, as the pair had for the first time reached the Pacific Ocean, themselves. The view was nothing short of majestic, the shorelines plentiful with a contour and texture that I'd never seen before; there were actual mountains, it seemed, jutting into the ocean. Up until this time, the only beaches I had ever seen were the smooth, relatively featureless ones in the Carolinas, Maryland, and Florida. Shortly after I took this photograph, I discovered a truth about the northern Pacific that should have been obvious; the water is FREEZING! I spent the better part of the day reeling from the strange dichotomy of being at a beach, in the hottest months of the summer, and knowing that some of the coldest water I've ever been was right there, across the beach. Even more bewildering was the fact that people were playing in it like it was nothing.

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